Using Technology in the Early Childhood Classroom

Do you see the use of specific things like computers as part of an early childhood curriculum as being powerful enough to change brain development the same way you’ve just described television?

Dr. Perry: Absolutely. I think the difference between computers and television is that television tends to be quite passive. You sit and you are watching and things are happening in front of you but you don’t do anything. Children are natural “manipulators” of the world — they learn through controlling the movement and interactions between objects in their world — dolls, blocks, toy cars, their own bodies. With television, they watch and do not control anything. Computers allow interaction. Children can control the pace and activity and make things happen on computers. They can also repeat an activity again and again if they choose.

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By Kimberly Moore Kneas, Ph.D. and Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D.

The Role of Technology in Early Childhood Programs

We are always looking for the magic bullet, something that will solve all our problems. And, today this magic bullet for education is technology. It will solve all our problems! It will increase academic skills, reduce dropout rates, eliminate the racial divide in academic performance, and increase SAT scores. And it will make the lives of teachers easier. Well, it may not accomplish all of these goals, but educational technology does have a place in early childhood. Right?

It depends on an early childhood program’s overall program goals and objectives, and the program’s goals and objectives for each student. And it depends on how computers are incorporated into the early childhood curriculum (Haugland, 2000).

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By Francis Wardle, Ph.D.